How to create irresistible landing page content

As you’re probably already aware, landing pages enable your website to capture a visitor’s information via a conversion form. Traffic usually arrives from a specific source, such as an email campaign, company blog or pay-per-click advertisement. The landing page typically serves a particular purpose, like enabling the visitor to sign up to a free trial or download content.

Landing pages allow any website to single out a target audience, provide something of value and convert a high percentage of traffic into leads. It has been found to work incredibly well too and the more landing pages you have the better according to one Hubspot report, in which companies saw a 55 per cent upsurge in leads if they increase the number of landing pages on their site by 10 to 15 percent.

Landing page statistics

But in order to reap the rewards of multiple landing pages, a few essential elements are required. Along with a relevant title, one or two engaging images and an obvious call-to-action, some irresistible copy is of the upmost importance.

The written word has the potential to make or break any landing page. But if you can create something engaging, entertaining, informative and useful, leads will inevitably increase.

How do I write irresistible landing page copy?

  • – Make a promise to the visitor
  • – Be as helpful as possible
  • – Use action-orientated language in headings
  • – Use value-orientated language in the body
  • – Write in the second person
  • – Go for clarity over creativity
  • – Format your landing page to engage the visitor

Encourage action

The whole purpose of a landing page is to encourage the visitor to take action, so copy should be tailored to inspire this objective. A lot of the time, compelling and captivating copy will attempt to enhance a brand’s reputation, encourage dialogue or increase search engine visibility by using a high density of relevant keywords.

But with specific landing pages, this is not the case. You need to communicate with the visitor directly and persuade them to take action by filtering out any other online objectives you may have.

Be specific

You don’t get much time on the Internet to convince visitors your business or brand provides a better product or service than others. So when it comes to landing pages, you need to be specific and explicit with your pitch by getting straight to the point.

The first two or three sentences must provide the most relevant and important information. But at the same time, it should persuade and encourage the visitor that they need your product or service. Any additional copy, which is engaging and useful, can be included elsewhere.

Keep it simple

The best way of getting straight to the point is by keeping it simple with short sentences and basic words. This is neither the time nor the place to show off your vast creative vocabulary or complicated industry jargon. Landing page copy is not there to impress, it is meant to increase conversions.

Even though you’ve got a target audience in mind, everybody should be able to read and understand this copy. You’ll struggle to secure leads if visitors can’t make head nor tail of what your product or service is.

Have a unique selling point

In today’s highly competitive online world, scores of brands and businesses are jostling for position and trying to secure the same customers and clients. Therefore, landing page visitors should be aware of what differentiates you from rivals and what is unique about your product or service.

Again, you’ll need to define your distinctiveness and individuality at the most basic level possible. Think about breaking it down into a primary headline, sub header, reinforcement statement and a closing argument.

Speak of the benefits

Along with grabbing the audience’s attention with a few simple opening sentences or a specific unique selling point, now is the opportunity to list some benefits. Why should the customer take this action? What affect will it have on them?

Rather that going into an extensive body of text, summarise the main benefits with bullet points for clearness and clarity. You can either compare these merits with what competitors are offering or apply them to a real-life situation. However, always have a brief statement first and then go into more detail later.

Evoke audience emotions

Whether you choose to identify with consumers or simple pull on their heartstrings, evoking some emotion can be very effective and hugely beneficial. From excitement and elation to fear and concern, several different feelings can encourage a visitor to take the action you require.

Landing page copy can help the audience visualise themselves with your product or offer, which arouses positivity. Alternatively, anxiousness or stressed could be quashed if you’re solving a common problem. In both cases, emotion plays a crucial role.

Tell a story

Storytelling is an increasingly popular technique when it comes to content marketing, but it can also improve and strengthen the objective of your landing pages. Sometimes interesting facts and statistics are effective, but compelling stories can also convince visitors to take action.

For example, a study by Carnegie Mellon University found that charity appeals, which told a story rather than detailing statistics or a combination of the two, resulted in a higher average donation.

Show evidence of social satisfaction

Social media is transforming digital marketing efforts and campaigns like never before. But landing pages can also utilise the power of people by proving that products or services have received social approval and appreciation.

Demonstrate that other people have bought your product, signed up to a free trial or downloaded content just like Basecamp’s homepage. These can take the form of customer testimonials, social network statistics or industry recognition.

Keep it in the second person

If you’re writing a company blog, then writing in the first person is fine. But for landing pages, the focus needs to be on the audience and how your product or service can benefit them.

The value of your offer will increase if visitors can relate to what is being said. They won’t be scared of by an explicit sales pitch, but at the same time, will receive something useful and of value by copy that is highly targeted.

Don’t forget your call to action

At the end of the day, your landing page is there to serve a purpose, which usually involves collecting and curating visitor information. Copy can promote a product or service by listing the benefits and unique selling points, but you still need a defined call to action in order to achieve your initial objective.

Just like the copy, it should clear and to the point. Try and keep conversion forms as short as possible but briefly summarise the value of your offer. Avoid the standard ‘click here’ or ‘submit’ buttons by choosing a few words that articulates what the visitor will receive.

How to write Landing page copy summary

It is tempting to approach any landing page copy like another piece of promotion, publicity or content marketing. However, due its specific and defined requirements, it needs a more unique perspective.

Always have your end objective in mind and try to stick to this as closely as possible. Your opening statement or first few sentences should be precise yet clear-cut. After that, you can expand on the strong points of your offer and what makes it different to every other product or service on the market.

You can still add some creativity with some emotional storytelling, as this has been a successful tactic in the past. What’s more, social proof can also add weight to your argument so add it if you have it.

Looking for a landing page expert to write your landing page content? Talk to us. We’ve helped over fifty start-ups and SMEs increase their conversion rates with irresistible content. Oh, and we charge just £0.05 per word. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *